Dr. Ron’s Research Review – May 20, 2020

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This week’s research review focuses on iron for ACE inhibitor cough

ACE inhibitors are associated with a dry, tickly, persistent cough in 5%-35% of patients.

Iron

A study examined whether (1) the cough associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy is attenuated by oral intake of iron and anti-oxidants, and (2) nitric oxide (NO) has any role in this attenuation.
Of the 100 patients under investigation, cough occurred in 28 of them with preponderance in females. All the 28 patients were followed up for six weeks: the first two weeks were the observation period and the remaining four weeks the experimentation period.
After the observation period, 11 patients received a single oral dose of ferrous sulphate (200 mg), eight received vitamin E (200 mg, o.d.) and vitamin C (150 mg, o.d.) and nine were given placebo during the experimentation period. Cough scoring, serum NO and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined during both the periods.
While there were significant decreases in cough scores, NO and MDA levels between these two periods in the iron group, cough scores and MDA level decreased significantly in the anti-oxidant group. None of these parameters changed in the control group. NO level was found to be increased significantly in patients who developed cough (n = 28) compared with those who did not cough (n = 72).
These results suggest that iron supplementation suppresses cough in patients on ACE-I therapy through its effect on NO generation. (Bhalla et al., 2011)

 

Dr. Ron

 


Articles

 

Attenuation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor induced cough by iron supplementation: role of nitric oxide.
(Bhalla et al., 2011)  Download
The present study examined whether (1) the cough associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy is attenuated by oral intake of iron and anti-oxidants, and (2) nitric oxide (NO) has any role in this attenuation. Of the 100 patients under investigation, cough occurred in 28 of them with preponderance in females. All the 28 patients were followed up for six weeks: the first two weeks were the observation period and the remaining four weeks the experimentation period. After the observation period, 11 patients received a single oral dose of ferrous sulphate (200 mg), eight received vitamin E (200 mg, o.d.) and vitamin C (150 mg, o.d.) and nine were given placebo during the experimentation period. Cough scoring, serum NO and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined during both the periods. While there were significant decreases in cough scores, NO and MDA levels between these two periods in the iron group, cough scores and MDA level decreased significantly in the anti-oxidant group. None of these parameters changed in the control group. NO level was found to be increased significantly in patients who developed cough (n = 28) compared with those who did not cough (n = 72). These results suggest that iron supplementation suppresses cough in patients on ACE-I therapy through its effect on NO generation.

 

References

Bhalla, P, NP Singh, and K Ravi (2011), ‘Attenuation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor induced cough by iron supplementation: role of nitric oxide.’, J Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone Syst, 12 (4), 491-97. PubMed: 21421658