UVBI Abstracts 3

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[Experience in the use of autotransfusions of laser-irradiated blood in treating hypertension patients].
            (Alizade and Karaeva, 1994) Download
Autotransfusion of laser light-irradiated blood (5-7 sessions) was found to facilitate a steady arterial blood pressure fall by an average 24% of the initial level in patients with hypertensive disease. Drop in the arterial blood pressure following the course of autotransfusion of laser light-irradiated blood was accompanied by improvement in general condition of the patients, enhancement of the effectiveness of antihypertensive preparations, favourable shifts in immunological and haemorheological indices. After discharge from hospital beneficial clinical effect persisted for up to 4-8 months. The preliminary data obtained suggest that autotransfusion of laser light-irradiated blood may well be used as adjunct to a complex of therapeutic measures to be taken to control hypertensive disease.

The irradiation of autotransfused blood by ultraviolet spectral energy: results of therapy in 110 cases
            (Barrett, 1940) Download
From an experience with 110 patients so far treated (February 16, 1938, to October 15, 1939), it can therefore be truthfully asserted that: 1. No detrimental reactions from ultraviolet irradiation have been observed. With the factors employed it is a very safe method. 2. Improvement is frequently almost immediate. 3. The field of usefulness of ultraviolet therapy has been considerably widened by the Knott method.

The combined effect of hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation on bacterial spores.
            (Bayliss and Waites, 1979) Download
Ultra-violet (u.v.) light irradiation of spores of Bacillus subtilis in the presence of hydrogen peroxide produced a rapid kill which was up to 2000-fold greater than that produced by irradiation alone. A kill of 99.99% was produced by 30s U.V. irradiation of spores of 6 strains of Bacillus and Closfridiumin the presence of hydrogen peroxide 1.0g/100 ml but with the more resistant spores of 9 further strains, irradiation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide 2.5 g/100 ml followed by mild heating was required.

 

[Use of re-infusions of isolated irradiated auto-blood for the correction of hematopoietic disorders].
            (Gaĭseniuk, 1987) Download
The effectiveness of re-infusions of auto-blood after isolated irradiation used for the correction of hemocytopenia developing during cancer chemotherapy was studied in 77 patients. 200 ml of the patient's blood was taken into a flask with a preservative and irradiated at an absorbed dose of 220 Gy on the RUM-17 x-ray apparatus. After irradiation the blood was reinfused to a patient. Posttransfusion reactions in the patients were absent. The efficacy and technical simplicity of the method of re-infusions of auto-blood after isolated irradiation make it applicable in clinical practice for the correction of hemopoietic disorders in cancer patients.

Blood irradiation for intraoperative autotransfusion in cancer surgery: demonstration of efficient elimination of contaminating tumor cells.
            (Hansen et al., 1999) Download
BACKGROUND:  Intraoperative blood salvage is contraindicated in cancer surgery because of contaminating tumor cells and the risk of systemic dissemination. On the basis of the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, irradiation of salvaged blood with 50 Gy is proposed as a way to allow return of salvaged blood. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:  Elimination of tumor cells by blood irradiation was studied in vitro with cells from 10 cell lines and from 14 tumor preparations after their addition to red cells in high numbers, or with blood shed during cancer surgery. Before and after gamma radiation, tumor cells were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and tested for their proliferative capacity in a cell colony assay. DNA metabolism was analyzed by incorporation of 5' bromodesoxyuridine. RESULTS:  Survival curves of cells from various tumors confirmed D0 (the dose required to reduce the fraction of surviving cells to 37 percent of the original value) values in the range of 1.2 to 2.2 Gy. After irradiation of tumor cell-contaminated blood with 50 Gy, no cell colony formation was observed, which indicates a reduction rate exceeding 10 log. Irradiated cancer cells showed viability, but no residual DNA metabolism. CONCLUSION:  The level of inactivation by a 50-Gy dose far exceeds that needed to inactivate the number of proliferating tumor cells observed or expected in wound blood. These results provide the experimental basis for the clinical application of blood irradiation for intraoperative blood salvage in cancer surgery.


 

[Use of autotransfusion of UV-irradiated blood in chronic bronchitis].
            (Ivanov et al., 2002) Download
Effectiveness of rehabilitation with therapeutic complex based on autotransfusion of UV-radiated blood (ATUVRB) was studied in 81 patients with chronic bronchitis (CB). The course consisted of 5 procedures with interval 2-3 days. The first procedure was exploratory with irradiated blood 0.5-0.8 ml/kg body weight. Control group comprised 48 CB patients getting conventional complex of rehabilitation measures. As shown by clinical criteria, clinico-biochemical indices, immunograms, external respiration function, ATUVRB-based rehabilitation corrects main pathogenetic mechanisms of CB.

The treatment of infectious disease with a medical device: results of a clinical trial of ultraviolet blood irradiation (UVBI) in patients with hepatitis C infection.
            (Kuenstner et al., 2015)  Download
OBJECTIVES:  Prior to the advent of therapies with sustained virological response rates of 94%, this study was conducted for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to assess the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet blood irradiation (UVBI) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS:  Nine patients received 15 UVBI treatments over the course of 22 weeks with the AVIcure Hemo-modulator, which was modified from the original Knott Hemo-irradiator. The patients' viral loads and liver function tests were obtained periodically during the study and analyzed during the course of the trial. RESULTS:  At the end of the study, the overall mean reduction in HCV viral load was 21.5% (p = 0.023); on day 140, direct bilirubin declined by 41.1% (p=0.0059), aspartate aminotransferase declined by 15.2% (p=0.0069), and alanine aminotransferase declined by 19.3% (p=0.0031). The nadir of the mean and median viral load occurred on day 259, and it corresponded to a mean viral load reduction of 44.9% (p=0.0048). During the course of the study, three patients had a greater than 0.5 log reduction in viral load (patient 1, 0.56 log reduction on day 259; patient 4, 0.69 log reduction at the end of the study; patient 11, 0.91 log reduction on day 259). Two patients showed marked improvement in their concurrent psoriasis at the conclusion of the trial. CONCLUSIONS:  In this study, UVBI was safe and had a beneficial effect in the treatment of HCV. This device should be studied for use in psoriasis and in infectious diseases that have few treatment options. This article describes a prospective, controlled, phase II clinical trial submitted to the FDA of this device used for the treatment of HCV infection (Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) #G030242).


 

The physiologic effects of ultraviolet radiation
            (Laurens, 1938) Download
The physiologic effects of ultraviolet radiation, in contrast to pathology and therapy, are difficult to grasp and to reduce to brief fundamentals.

Disappearance of hemolytic staphylococcus aureus septicemia following ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy: Knott technic
            (Miley, 1943a) Download
The following is a case report of a young student nurse who recovered rather dramatically from hemolytic staphylococcus aureus septicemia following two applications of ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy (Knott technic). The following case report shows clearly what can be accomplished if ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy is instituted early in the course of the disease, if whole blood transfusions are used as indicated, and if no sulfa drugs whatsoever are used. In the last four and one-half years the Blood Irradiation Clinic of the Hahnemann MedicaI College and Hospital of Philadelphia has given over 3,000 blood irradiaions, and has observed no deleterious effects whatsoever, a fact which has allowed a much broader clinical tria1 in a much greater variety of clinical entities than wouId have been possible had there been any significant danger factor present.

The control of acute thrombophlebitis with ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy
            (Miley, 1943b) Download
The sudden appearance of acute thrombophlebitis is one of the most unpredictable and unwelcome complications encountered in medicine. In the last four years we have used the Knott technic of ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy in thirteen consecutive cases of thrombophlebitis with highly satisfactory results.

Ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy; further studies in acute infections.
            (Miley and Christensen, 1947) Download
In the study of 445 consecutive and un-selected cases of acute pyogenic infections and seventy-four cases of virus or virus-like infections we have found that our original observations have been definitely confirmed and that not only sulfa- resistant infections have responded to this therapy but a high percentage of penicillin- resistant infections have also responded quite favorably. Ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy is in our opinion the safest and most efficient method of controlling most acute pyogenic infections with one notable exception, namely, subacute bacterial endocarditis.

 

Ultraviolet blood irradiation treatment of pelvic cellulitis; Knott method.
            (Olney, 1947) Download
Pelvic cellulitis, chronic pelvic infection or pelvic inflammatory disease constitutes the most common and persistent complaint for which women consult their doctors. Since June 1944, we have treated 631 patients with this condition with such unusually gratifying results that we believe they are worth reporting. Almost all massive inflammatory diseases will subside and recover completely without surgical intervention. During 25 years of practice I have never found any treatment for chronic pelvic cellulitis that compares with ultraviolet blood irradiation by the Knott technic as approved by the American Blood Irradiation Society.

Ultraviolet irradiation of autotransfused blood in the treatment of acute peritonitis
            (Rebbeck, 1941) Download
After approximately 3-½ years of clinical research at Shadyside Hospital in the treatment of various pyogenic infections, we are submitting our results in 14 cases of Acute peritonitis, general from perforation of a gangrenous appendix. In conclusion it is our belief that the ultraviolet irradiation of autotransfused blood is an excellent adjunct to the treatment of acute peritonitis, general.

Ultraviolet Blood Irradiation Therapy (Photo-Oxidation) The Cure That Time Forgot
            (Rowen, 1996) Download
In the 1940s, a multitude of articles appeared in the American literature detailing a novel treatment for infection. This treatment had a cure rate of 98 to 100% in early and moderately advanced infections, and approximately 50% in terminally moribund patients. Healing was not limited to just bacterial infections, but also viral (acute polio), wounds, asthma, and arthritis. Recent German literature has demonstrated profound improvements in a number of biochemical and hematologic markers. There has never been reported any toxicity, side effects or injury except for occasional Herxheiner type reactions. As infections are failing to improve with the use of chemical treatment, this safe and effective treatment should be revisited.

 


References

Alizade, IG and NT Karaeva (1994), ‘[Experience in the use of autotransfusions of laser-irradiated blood in treating hypertension patients].’, Lik Sprava, (5-6), 29-32. PubMed: 7831904
Barrett, HA (1940), ‘The irradiation of autotransfused blood by ultraviolet spectral energy: results of therapy in 110 cases’, Medical Clinics of North America, 24 (3), 723-32. PubMed:
Bayliss, CE and WM Waites (1979), ‘The combined effect of hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation on bacterial spores.’, J Appl Bacteriol, 47 (2), 263-69. PubMed: 541299
Gaĭseniuk, LA (1987), ‘[Use of re-infusions of isolated irradiated auto-blood for the correction of hematopoietic disorders].’, Med Radiol (Mosk), 32 (11), 15-18. PubMed: 3683116
Hansen, E, et al. (1999), ‘Blood irradiation for intraoperative autotransfusion in cancer surgery: demonstration of efficient elimination of contaminating tumor cells.’, Transfusion, 39 (6), 608-15. PubMed: 10378841
Ivanov, EM, OV Shakirova, and NS Zhuravskaia (2002), ‘[Use of autotransfusion of UV-irradiated blood in chronic bronchitis].’, Klin Med (Mosk), 80 (6), 21-25. PubMed: 12138795
Kuenstner, JT, et al. (2015), ‘The treatment of infectious disease with a medical device: results of a clinical trial of ultraviolet blood irradiation (UVBI) in patients with hepatitis C infection.’, Int J Infect Dis, 37 58-63. PubMed: 26092299
Laurens, H (1938), ‘The physiologic effects of ultraviolet radiation’, JAMA, 111 (26), 2385-92. PubMed:
Miley, G (1943a), ‘Disappearance of hemolytic staphylococcus aureus septicemia following ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy: Knott technic’, The American Journal of Surgery, 62 (2), 241-45. PubMed:
——— (1943b), ‘The control of acute thrombophlebitis with ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy’, Am J Surgery, 60 (3), 354-60. PubMed:
Miley, G and JA Christensen (1947), ‘Ultraviolet blood irradiation therapy; further studies in acute infections.’, Am J Surg, 73 (4), 486-93. PubMed: 20290583
Olney, RC (1947), ‘Ultraviolet blood irradiation treatment of pelvic cellulitis; Knott method.’, Am J Surg, 74 (4), 440-43. PubMed: 20266023
Rebbeck, EW (1941), ‘Ultraviolet irradiation of autotransfused blood in the treatment of acute peritonitis’, Hahneman. Monthly, 77 288. PubMed:
Rowen, RJ (1996), ‘Ultraviolet Blood Irradiation Therapy (Photo-Oxidation) The Cure That Time Forgot’, Int. J. Biosocial Med Research, 14 (2), 115-32. PubMed: