Helicobacter pylori Abstracts 2

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Clearance of chronic psoriasis after eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection.
            (Ali and Whitehead, 2008) Download
A 48-year-old English housewife patient with history of pyloroplasty and a Chronic epigastric pain proved to be secondary to H. pylori infection was treated by Lansoprazol capsules (30 mg twice daily), Clarithromycin tablets (500 mg twice daily) and amoxicillin capsules (1 g twice daily) for 7 days. She had the psoriasis for at least 15 years. She noticed a major improvement in her psoriasis within 2 weeks after treating her H. pylori infection and admitted that she did not use any treatment for psoriasis during this period.

Helicobacter pylori infection in psoriasis: results of a clinical study and review of the literature.
            (Campanati et al., 2015) Download
BACKGROUND:  Data from the literature concerning the role of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in psoriasis are still conflicting. This study was carried out to evaluate prevalence of H. pylori in patients with mild to severe psoriasis, correlation between H. pylori infection and severity of psoriasis, and effect of H. pylori eradication on the clinical course of psoriasis. METHODS:  Two hundred and ten patients with psoriasis and 150 healthy controls were screened for H. pylori through [(13) C] urea breath test at baseline (T0). All patients with psoriasis received standardized phototherapy treatment, and those infected by H. pylori were also treated with a 1-week triple therapy, then they were all re-evaluated four weeks later at the end of therapy (T5). RESULTS:  The prevalence of H. pylori was not higher in psoriasis than in the control group (20.27 vs. 22%; P > 0.05). Patients infected by H. pylori showed more severe psoriasis than uninfected patients (psoriasis area and severity index score 17.9 ± 7.1 vs. 13.7 ± 6.9; P = 0.04), and patients who received successful eradication of H. pylori infection showed a greater improvement of psoriasis than the others (psoriasis area and severity index score at T5 in patients infected by H. pylori was 8.36 ± 3.76, in uninfected patients was 10.85 ± 3.49; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS:  Patients with mild to severe psoriasis do not show a greater prevalence of H. pylori infection; however, H. pylori seems able to affect the clinical severity of psoriasis.


Complete remission of palmoplantar psoriasis through Helicobacter pylori eradication: a case report.
            (Martin Hübner and Tenbaum, 2008) Download
We describe the case of a 35-year-old man, presenting symptoms consistent with severe PPP restricted exclusively to the palms and soles and impairing mobility. Due to the patient’s history of dyspepsia and due to a recent report associating Helicobacter pylori infection with PPP, a 13C-urea breath test was performed and the presence of H. pylori infection was confirmed. Consequently, standard treatment for H. pylori eradication, consisting of amoxycillin (1 g twice daily) and clarythro- mycin (500 mg twice daily) for 7 days, in association with omeprazole (20 mg twice daily) was started. Four weeks later H. pylori eradication was confirmed. After 6 weeks, the symptoms of PPP started to remit gradually, first on the palms and more slowly on the soles. One year later, physical examination found no symptoms of PPP symptoms and no reinfection with H. pylori. At the 3-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of the symptoms.

Beyond the stomach: an updated view of Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.
            (Testerman and Morris, 2014) Download
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an extremely common, yet underappreciated, pathogen that is able to alter host physiology and subvert the host immune response, allowing it to persist for the life of the host. H. pylori is the primary cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. In the United States, the annual cost associated with peptic ulcer disease is estimated to be $6 billion and gastric cancer kills over 700000 people per year globally. The prevalence of H. pylori infection remains high (> 50%) in much of the world, although the infection rates are dropping in some developed nations. The drop in H. pylori prevalence could be a double-edged sword, reducing the incidence of gastric diseases while increasing the risk of allergies and esophageal diseases. The list of diseases potentially caused by H. pylori continues to grow; however, mechanistic explanations of how H. pylori could contribute to extragastric diseases lag far behind clinical studies. A number of host factors and H. pylori virulence factors act in concert to determine which individuals are at the highest risk of disease. These include bacterial cytotoxins and polymorphisms in host genes responsible for directing the immune response. This review discusses the latest advances in H. pylori pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Up-to-date information on correlations between H. pylori and extragastric diseases is also provided.


 

References

Ali, M and M Whitehead (2008), ‘Clearance of chronic psoriasis after eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection.’, J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol, 22 (6), 753-54. PubMedID: 18005018
Campanati, A, et al. (2015), ‘Helicobacter pylori infection in psoriasis: results of a clinical study and review of the literature.’, Int J Dermatol, 54 (5), e109-14. PubMedID: 25808243
Martin Hübner, A and SP Tenbaum (2008), ‘Complete remission of palmoplantar psoriasis through Helicobacter pylori eradication: a case report.’, Clin Exp Dermatol, 33 (3), 339-40. PubMedID: 18201263
Testerman, TL and J Morris (2014), ‘Beyond the stomach: an updated view of Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.’, World J Gastroenterol, 20 (36), 12781-808. PubMedID: 25278678